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Source: Performance Conditioning
By Alan Jaeger

“In Season” Arm Conditioning and Maintenance Throwing Program:
Integrating Long Toss into Bull-pens and In-season Pitching

In the previous article, we addressed the importance of the timing and format of an “Off Season Throwing Program”, and the need of establishing a “rest” (2-4 weeks) and “rebuild” period (approximately 4 weeks) after a long summer. It was also mentioned how important it was to stay off of the mound for this initial 4 week, base building period. The idea was that the better you build your base in the Fall/Winter months, the better you are able to maximize your health, strength and endurance “in season“. As you may recall, the key to optimizing the health, strength and endurance of your arm “in season” is significantly reflected by how well you are able to maintain this base throughout the Fall/Winter months, and translate it into the Spring. read more

By Mental Basics of Baseball Have you ever been on the mound and found yourself in a rhythm where your pumping the zone full of strikes and everything seems to be going your way? If pitchers could find this "rhythm" or "zone" more often wouldn't that be great?

 Well there are a few things you can do to find your rhythm more often.

THROW STRIKE 1

The first component of finding your rhythm is strike 1. You've got to get ahead in the count. It's hard to find a rhythm if your constantly behind and trying to battle back into an advantageous count. Make it a point before each new batter to focus on the idea of throwing strike 1.

 WORK DELIGENTLY

The next piece of the puzzle is to work diligently. I don't want you to think "fast", but rather "faster'. Be intentional after each pitch-whether it was good or bad- to get the ball back from the catcher, toe the rubber, get your signal and go back to work. I see a lot of young pitchers take way too much time in between each pitch. They get the ball, rub it down, take off their cap and wipe their forehead, walk around behind the mound, or do a variety of other things-and then toe the rubber and start over. read more

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Whether it’s rolling out of bed in the morning, or rolling a double play, movement is something most of us take for granted. But, in my opinion, improving our understanding of how movement is generated is absolutely vital for improving our abilities as coaches (or athletes). This article is by no means the definitive article on pitching mechanics -- it is simply a small step towards improving motor control literacy in the pitching community.

A Brief History of Motor Control: How Does Movement Come to Be? read more

By Alex Shapiro

It is December and most high school baseball programs are kicking off their off-season workouts while some may be well underway. Off-season workouts are critical in determining how prepared a player is for the season as we all know. Workouts may be consist of hitting the weight room, the track, or could include open hitting sessions for players, among several other things that benefit a team and its players. However, off-season workouts are not mandatory. I struggle with the word mandatory in regards to off-season workouts as a coach, as I am sure some of you out there reading this article do the same. We, as coaches, probably scratch our head from time to time wondering where some guys are when they are not showing up and perhaps even why. I get it—some players have jobs, some play other sports, and some do things on their own, which is great, no doubt about that. Some things come up from time to time like doctor’s appointments or tutoring sessions, and some just do not show up at all. But, there are some things players need to know about off-season workouts and why their attendance is in fact mandatory. read more